A Royal boost for coral reef global campaign

Prince Charles coral reef IYOR

As we now know, the world’s Coral Reefs are gravely endangered by ocean warming and climate change.

The need for action was highlighted by the  International Year of the Reef.

An important IYOR event was a gathering of the world’s top coral reef experts at an event hosted by HRH The Prince of Wales Sustainability Office. The profile of the whole campaign gained significant momentum with an address by HRH The Prince of Wales.

The media relations for IYOR at the gathering in London were provided by Positively Media. Within minutes, the major digital and print channels had distributed our images, with the key messages.

If you’ve got a story to tell, let’s talk!

Google goes underwater in the coral triangle

google seaview coral triangle

Google is immersing itself in ocean change. You can now ‘dive’ with a survey team in a virtual reality experience. Why not explore underwater locations in the Coral Triangle? Check out the content in Google Maps. It is all possible following a partnership with Positively Media clients The Ocean Agency and XL Catlin (now AXAXL).

The more people know about our oceans, the better. With Google, you can discover a  hidden world with stunning images exactly as if you were there yourself. See this amazing underwater world on your screen is helping to overcome the biggest problem for ocean change communicators: if it is out of sight, it is out of mind.

Twitter Lists

phone screen for managing twitter lists

Whether you are a list lover or loather there is no doubt that Twitter Lists can be really useful. 

Looking for the right accounts to follow?

A great way to quickly identify accounts that could be of interest is to find a relevant list. This is a great way to kick-start a new Twitter account, or identify new customers or influencers. The best place to start is thinking about who may have similar interests to you. That could be an individual or an organisation. Open up the full profile of the twitter account and look to see if they have lists. If they are any good, it is like finding gold dust.

Subscribe to other peoples’ lists!

If you’ve found a list that looks useful, then subscribe! There is no need to create a list yourself, just follow one that someone else has assembled. There’s every chance that a topic you would find useful, for example media providers, specialist food producers or creative designers, then someone else will have a list already. If they’ve been generous enough to make that list public, then all you need to do is subscribe!

Spending too much time scrolling through your timeline and not finding posts you want to read?

Create your own lists as way of coping with volumes of posts, and for sifting out the posts that you are most likely to be interested in. Work out some categories for the accounts you follow and place your favourites into lists. When you check your twitter feed by looking at the list, you will have filtered posts, seeing only those of relevance to you.

Storytelling at the speed of a shutter click

XL-Catlin-Seaview-Survey-American-Samoa-5-1

Research reveals that we only remember about 10% of what we hear and 20% of what we read. Our superpower is our eyesight: we retain a massive 80 percent of what we see. Our brain is great at visual processing, making the value of images very powerful. They attract, explain, inspire and teach us in ways that are memorable. Today, we’re bombarded by information and it is a problem separating what is important from the clutter. Fortunately, our brains ability to interpret an image at 13 milliseconds is lightening fast, making the value of great visuals even greater. You have 13 milliseconds to create interest.

Photos give depth to a story and at Positively we use them in our storytelling. We took audiences into the ocean to understand the impacts of global warming. The images immediately engage people with the drama captured by the dive teams in remote places.